Intro to Theme IX: Games

We play a lot of games at NYU. Besides the chess matches at any of the major parks in the area (although they far too often have empty chairs), we go to campus with the assurance that we don’t completely know what to expect. We come from dorm rooms we weren’t sure we were going to get, assuming you beat the housing lottery and could get into a dorm; we take classes that we barely made the wait-list on; depending on how well you studied, the next test you walk into is a game of chance.

Of course, some people would like to pretend they have everything under control, but this is a much less fun way of approaching things.

Regards,

Jonathan Kesh

Under the Arch Editor

There's a "Global Network University" joke in here somewhere, but we'll avoid it for now

Probably an “NYU-2031″ joke in here somewhere, but that’s for another day

Table of Contents (updated throughout the week):

Elevator Etiquette by Hae Bin Kim

Posted in Introduction | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Theme IX, Games: Elevator Etiquette

By Hae Bin Kim

“Take the stairs next time, bitch!”

Well, I sure did, after that incident. At Founders Hall, there is something called “Elevator Etiquette.” It’s not just an urban rumor or some vague phrase; it’s a legitimate tenet that the dorm encourages its residents to follow. The Elevator Etiquette is the fundamental rule that if you are able to, you must walk up or down one flight of stairs if the button above or below your floor is already pressed. Apparently, this will save lots of time and energy for everyone.

From elevation.wikia.com

The Elevator Etiquette is almost like a mandatory ritual at Founders. The social pressure that comes from a single elevator ride is immense. As soon as someone hits that 9th floor and you live on the 8th floor, you are immediately obliged to walk down one set of stairs. The residents who are hit the hardest by this are the ones who live on the lower floors, especially the 2nd floor people. If one of them ignores this rule and decides to just press the 2nd floor while on ground level, then they will receive a great deal of eyeing and mutterings of curses under breath.

Continue reading

Posted in Feature, Personal Essay | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Theme VIII, Horror: Dark History of Washington Square

By Ariana DiValentino

It’s no secret that New York is a goldmine for paranormal enthusiasts and folklore junkies. Without statues to rub for luck and centuries-old ghost stories — only a mostly-joking belief held by some that there is a correlation between walking under the arch and graduating — NYU may not be as steeped in campus tradition as some of our benchmarks, but hints of superstition are visible in our urban habitat nonetheless. Lafayette Hall skips thirteenth rooms on each floor and the 13th floor entirely, as much as a 17-story building can lack a 13th floor, as does the much-newer Gramercy Green, built within the last decade. Rumours of haunting right on our own campus are one of the pieces of NYU history we share with alumni generations before us, namely the ghostly presences felt in Brittany Hall, supposedly stemming from its colorful history as the Brittany Hotel. But some deeply buried legends tell stories older than the horror-movie tropes they seem to have been ripped from. A university as old as ours in a city as rich and complex as New York is bound to have a few skeletons in its historical closet, and in fact there are thousands that we share the square with. What’s most disturbing is that these forgotten tales are far from myth.

University Building Watercolor and Engraving by A.J. Davis, c. 1833

University Building Watercolor and Engraving by A.J. Davis, c. 1833

Continue reading

Posted in Feature, Investigative Reporting | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Intro to Theme VIII: Horror

NYU can be a scary place, in many more ways than one. Not in a “spooky” way, in the sense that we’re filled with sheet-ghosts, pumpkins and plastic skeletons, as the word spooky now suggests; New York can be intimidating, classes can be overwhelming, and the environment is generally cold.

It’s Halloween, so I won’t waste too much of your time with a drawn-out explanation of why our next theme is “Horror.” However, as we are an NYU blog, expect content to be largely New York-centered, particularly around Washington Square Park, which itself has some odd stories surrounding it.

Not this kind of scary. Not spooky.

Regards,

Jonathan Kesh

Under the Arch Editor

 

Table of Contents (updated throughout the week):

Dark History of Washington Square by Ariana DiValentino

Posted in Introduction | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Theme VII, Spectrum: Israeli vs American Politics

By Omri Bezalel

A few weeks ago an NYU student commented to a mutual friend that I was very “right wing.” I’m Israeli and the comment was made after a discussion among myself and other American students about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. No one in Israel had ever pegged me on the right side of the Israeli political spectrum (which on a military scale, left might mean more dovish and right more hawkish), which led me to wonder why the spectrum is different in New York than it is in Tel Aviv.

Individual maps taken from Wikipedia

Individual maps taken from Wikipedia

One reason is the completely different realities of the two cities. Most spectra deal with beliefs and opinions, but where do facts come into play? In Israel’s case, surely there are things we can agree on: Children and innocents on both sides should not be killed. Israelis should not be bombarded with missiles. And Hamas is not an innocent organization. But do these fall in different places on different political spectra, or do they simply rest in place as the spectrum slides around them to readjust? The truth about facts is hard to grasp without experiencing the reality of the situation first hand. Many people in New York are missing that context.

Continue reading

Posted in Feature | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment